Need A Doctor ?

c1Got that blah feeling —
No energy ?

Having problems
keeping the yang up?

Maybe you need a Doctor ?

Too expensive, huh?

Well, you could always
consult Dan Cupid, M.D. —

“Dan Cupid M.D.”
was a best selling
postcard series
by Boston Globe
cartoonist50
(and M.I.T. Grad)
Walter Wellman,
released around the
turn of the century.

The cards are mostly dated
between 1905 and 1908.

Although the series did feature
some suggestive art and captions,
they were mostly pretty mild —

But, anything
but run of the mill.

Wellman was quite popular
for his illustrations at the time,
and these cards made himsympathy
almost a household name.

As a successful artist,
he had no trouble
lampooning the social trends
and practices of the era,

— and this series of cards
targeted the medical profession,
and the tendencies
of it’s practitioners,
toward all-knowing,
and self-righteousness.

The Doctor is question,
— Dan Cupid, M.D.,
seemed to be very goodbeach
with making pat diagnoses,
and stating the obvious —

Not to mention charging
exorbitant fees for doing same.

Really, stuff doesn’t seem
to have changed
that much, I guess.

Except of course,
the house calls thing —
which is long dead,
around here, anyway.

The series started outlemon
giving snarky advice
about love —
but pretty soon,
had branched out into
all sorts of different subjects.

Reading between the lines
is very important in
understanding a Wellman card —

—  any Wellman card —

but especially these.

You’ll probably notice
that in these cards,shake
Wellman has a propensity
to hide sardonic
messages in them.

A favorite tactic of his, yes.

In this case,
he usually put a sign
on the wall in the background,
with some message he thought
would skew the card’s
tone off to the viewer.

On the right,
you see the sign says:
“I’m so lonesome” —

Note the rather10
unattractive lady,
with the rather attractive
bag of money,
on the love seat.

And the seeming ardency
of the suitor, on the floor.

There’s also a black cat
for good measure.

Yow.

That notwithstanding,

the original sender
of that particular card,
wasn’t satisfied withrepeat
it’s snarkiness level —
because he crossed off
‘soothing syrup’ —
and added the word ‘cider’…

as if to suggest
that maybe the receiver
needed to cut back
on their drinking a bit, too.

Boy,
getting mail back then
could be a traumatizing
experience, apparently.

My favorites are the onesderrick
dealing with dating and mating….

But married couples who fought
like cats and dogs got
the Wellman treatment,
too,

— as you can see in this next card.

It seems as if
maybe the husband got the
worst of that particular argument, huh?

Plasters were what passed as
bandages before the days
of SpongeBob Band Aids.

( I do like the a1a
Scooby Doo ones, too. )

Although,
I’d say the advice given on this card
was worth the five bucks, in this case.

Violence never helped
ANY relationship improve.

Take it from your Ole Uncle Nuts.

Wellman postcards
can be an
educational experience,

and certainly a fun one,

and there are plenty
more Walter Wellmanwellman1
masterworks in my archive,

——– should you
wish to dig deeper.

Just click on the link
that says: Wellman Art .

You know, like, right there.

In the meantime,
remember to stay healthy
and be sure to take your meds.

.

!!!! HOY !!!!!!

cupid

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6 thoughts on “Need A Doctor ?

  1. hjonasson says:

    I think it’s just difficult for me to get past the no pants thing. I just keep wondering how I would react if my doctor walked in with no pants.

  2. Ha, these are a hoot! 😀
    I wonder if Dan Cupid, MD knows Dr. Love?! 😉
    HUGS!!! 😛

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