Not The DeLorean DMC-12 Again

Okay….

So, every car-oriented blog
eventually talks about the
famous (or infamous)
DeLorean DMC-12 –

– you know, the car that was
used as the time machine
by the mad professor in
“Back To The Future”.

But, there are some
interesting historical
tidbits that are usually
skipped over that we
might have some fun
with on our Saturday car
post- since we’re less of a
car oriented blog and
more of a smart-assed
one, anyway.

Most folks think that the
DeLorean DMC-12 was the
first stainless steel bodied
automobile — it was not —
the 1936 Ford SS Tudor
Deluxe was.

Stainless Steel is an excellent
material from which to make
a car– rust-resistant, durable –
– and John DeLorean definitely
had the right idea.

There are several reasons that
automakers use to explain
why it isn’t used — but the
truth has some to do with
added expense and a lot to
do with planned obsolescence.

Cars that don’t wear out
fast, don’t get replaced fast.

Sales suffer.
Auto executives don’t get
their million dollar bonuses.

So it was, certainly, something
that rankled his competition-

– but, truthfully, the failure
of DeLorean’s company had
very little to do with his choice
of material.

You might know
that the car
was made in a plant in
Northern Ireland, near Belfast.

But, did you know that
originally, DeLorean had
planned his factory to be
located in Puerto Rico,
and that the government
of Northern Ireland gave
him about 170 million bucks
to build it there instead.

DeLorean had several popular
celebrities as large investors
in his company as well —
including Johnny Carson
and Sammy Davis, Jr.

The engines in the DMC-12’s
were descended from the one
in the Renault Model 30 –
– a Peugeot-Renault-Volvo
2.8 liter V-6, and were built
in France.

So were the gearboxes-
the car was available in
automatic and a 5 speed
manual transmissions.
It had a top speed of
about 110 MPH.

DeLorean originally considered
calling his new car the ” Z-Tavio ”
– a conglomeration of his son’s
middle name, and his father’s
first.

But the ” DMC-12 ” designation
was chosen instead, because the
planned retail price for the car
was going to be around
$12,000 U.S. –
– after production began,
it turned out the MSRP was
more than twice that –
and the selling price was
about $15,000 over that –
making the average price
paid, in 1982, about $50,000.

Never intended as an
economical car, three
gold-plated DeLoreans
existed as of 1983-
2 were manufactured for the
American Express Company,
and one —

well, that’s part of another
interesting DMC-12 story…

It seems that there were
several hundred cars left in
some state of assembly when
the DeLorean company went
belly up.

Those cars, along with spare
parts, licenses, stock,
everything – got sold after
receivership to a company
which finished as many of
them as they could.

One of them was the
third gold DMC-12.

And the company?

Consolidated International.

Otherwise known as Big Lots.

Funny how stuff turns out
sometimes, ain’t it?

!! HOY !!

Advertisements