Classic Pin Up: Charlie Terrell

charlieterrell

Advertisements

West Of The Moon

It’s amazing —

— just how popular
a symbol the moon
was in
vintage postcards.

Depending on the card,
it could represent:

relationships,
sex,
social pressure,
unrequited love,
secret passion,
eternity– 

— and I guess the reason
it was used so commonly
was because using a
seemingly harmless
symbol like the moon
insures that you don’t
just have to come out
and say what you
really mean.

It’s got a mysterious,
numinous quality to it
that you wouldn’t get
with the simple and
relatively contemporary
iconography of
‘spooning’,
for instance.

And romance under
the moon has always
had a special nuance,
let’s face it.

Of course, it is a
very ancient symbol,
to be sure —
— as old as
humankind itself –

and over the centuries,
the emblem has stood
for:
the feminine principle,
spirituality
and the
supernatural,
the cyclical nature of life,
and the darker side
of human nature–
among other things.

There were several
ancient Goddesses
that were associated
with it:

including the
virgin huntress Artemis,
(who somehow also
represented maternity
and childbirth) —

and Hecate,
who was the
goddess of magic –
she ruled over the
special dominion
of the night.

Generally,
in the cards of the
early 1900’s —

I think you’ll get
a strong sense of
desire and passion –
perhaps even lust,
mixed with some
or all of the older
connotations, as well.

The real beauty of
a metaphor like this
is that you can give
it your own special
individual interpretation,
which makes the cards
great fun in any decade !

So, let your imagination
loose on these vintage
postcards and enjoy !!!!!!!

!!!!! HOY !!!!!!

You Come A Long Way Baby

varounds

Madison Avenue moguls
have always made a mint
on cigarette advertising.

Big business —
BIG,
BIG Business, man.

And the variety of ads
that have appeared
for tobacco products,
just here in the United States,

( Europe and Asia still have
a variety of brands like this … )

Femswould stagger the mind
of the un-initiated
newbie collector of
printed materials —

One of the most interesting
sub-genres of vintage
tobacco product
advertising collecting
has to do with products
made specifically for women.

Most people today probably
still remember
a brand called “Virginia Slims”,

— and their motto:

“You’ve Come A Long Way Baby”,

from the early 1970’s.haidee1914

But indeed,
cigarette advertising
geared toward women
really HAD already come
a very long way —

It started back in
the early 1900’s
with brands like ” Haidee “-

These featured:debs

red lipstick resistant tips,
a luxurious red foil inner wrap,
and specially perfumed choice tobaccos,

The pack even contained
a small make-up mirror
on the inside lid.

A very popular brand
put out by Benson and Hedges
during the 1930’s and 1940’s
was called

” Debs ” —

Their adverts were particularly
striking and well designed,

to appeal to the fashion-
conscious female of the era.beauty

The tips were also red,

to conceal lipstick prints
on the butt when it was
in the ashtray.

This innovation wasn’t
just copied by “Debs”, though —

A brand issued by Winston,
” Fems ” also used it.

As did a Marlboro offshoot
geared toward women,

called ” Marlboro Crimson Tips “russellpattersona

Other brands would use ‘lighter’ smoking tobacco,

fashion oriented advertising,

thinner profile cigarettes,

or just plain unadulterated
snob appeal to attempt
to attract feminine smokers.

Benson and Hedges offered a
variety of cigarette called the
“Virginia Rounds” ,

that featured advertising
with a sense of humor —

—- the illustrations were done
by famed American cartoonist
Russell Patterson —dumaurier

The cigarettes themselves offered
some weird filter configuration called “Corn Tips”.

All in all,
vintage cigarette ads
targeting women
clearly demonstrate
the tactics that
advertising companies
still use in selling
everything
— from soups to nuts.

And it’s not always going to be
in the consumer’s interests, either.

Like it or not,
one must always remember :

Caveat Emptor !!!!!

Hoy!

deb