Remembrances

remember

One of the things
that postcards were
supposed to do was
remind someone of
something —

whether it be
of a person,
a place,
a time,
a thing,
or even an idea….

A
remembrance.

Yes,
that’s it,kiddie
exactly.

I know that it seems
that sometimes that
this blog relies way
too much
upon references,
concepts,
perspectives,
and illustrationstryand
that may appear:
out of touch,
out-moded,
out of date,
and just plain out.

Yeah, I guess
that means
we’re dusty,
musty and
crusty, even.try

Our frame
of reference
is rather passé,
anachronistic,
démodé,
and old fashioned.

Yep,
so right.suit

And I don’t mind
any, or all, of that.

While maybe
many of the cards
give me some pause
for reflection about
their relevancy…

— the truth is
that those veryprop
propensities toward the
arcane and archaic are
a big part of what this
whole blog is about.

A guy in his middle age
(like it or not, I am)
learns
(or, hopefully learns)
to be able to
distinguishkids
between the oldies,
the goldies and
the moldies.

Hopefully, we can
interpet them
all on the
Müscleheaded Blog
in a way that is still
meaningful….

— and if not that,fredstone
then at least,
we can have
some fun with them.

Remembering the
relics of the past
is part and parcel
with learning from
the past –

It’s important toforgetbeach
understand
that living, breathing,
feeling human beings,
just like us,
produced and
enjoyed them-
they meant something
to them.

Yes, just as our relics
mean something to us,
and as we’d hope thatforge
they mean something
to someone in the future.

Perhaps it’s too much
to expect that they will
feel the same about them
as we do…..

…… but it’s enough
that we can share part
of those things thatbathing
we experience in our
short time here.

Let succeeding
generations
make what they
will of it.

I am content.

.
!!!!!! HOY !!!!!!!!

.

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Not Krakatoa, Karaktus

Keeping up appearances
was a very important
cultural imperative to
folks in the early 1900’s.

It may seem,
today,
that any artist
would shudder
at the thought
of creating hundreds
of pieces without the
ability to take credit
for them…..

But, we can certainly
understand why an
artist back then might
be very careful …

The clearest
example that
I can point to,
is in the case of
“King of Saucy
Postcards ” Donald
McGill, whose very
funny double-entendre
postcards generated
an awful lot of drama
and aggravation for him,
up to and including
an obscenity prosecution
(more like persecution)
in his native country
of Britain.

So, many artists chose
to veil their identities
behind pseudonyms,
which have kept things
calm on the home front,
but makes identification
of their work very
difficult for today’s
collectors.

Today, I offer a
prime illustration
( if you will…. )
of this principle —
the postcard creations
of one ” Karaktus “,
an artist doing work
for the Crown Publishing
Company in St. Albans,
England around the
turn of the century.

I have known several
individuals who insist
that Karaktus was a
well known illustrator
who also did cards
under his own name —
Fred Spurgin.

I’m a fan of his work,
and Karaktus’s, as well.

I just don’t see enough
similarities to say the
two people were one
and the same.

And nobody else has
been able to find out
just who Karaktus was.

( If you’d like to compare
the work of the two
yourself, see one of my
posts featuring Fred
Spurgin art here

It’s a mystery that
probably never
will be solved.

But, at least we can
enjoy his cards,
remembering,
of course,
that being an artist
isn’t always as easy
as it seems.

!!! HOY !!!