Coming Clean

Swift’s Pride Soap
and Washing Powder
was made in Chicago
by Swift & Company
from around 1875
into the 1930’s.

Swift was a famous
meat-packer, and
found that making
soap was a natural
extension of his
business – about
a dozen different
varieties of it were
manufactured at
the Chicago plant
as well as in Atlanta,
Georgia.

They included
several perfumed
soaps and specialty
cleansers like:
Swift’s Pride
Washing Powder,
Sunbrite Cleaner,
Swift’s Wool Soap,
and a product called
Lexard Superfatted
Toilet Bar .

The cards featured
on the blog today
are advertising cards
for the Swift’s Pride
line of soaps from
around 1905 ;

As you can see,
they’re beautifully
illustrated with a
child and
the shadow
of an animal —-
nicely litho’d,
and containing
a witty verse on
each.

For instance:

” Susie’s song
was very sweet,
She never
missed 
a note,

Her voice was
just
a little bleat,

It sounded like
a goat. “

.

” Bertha’s bonnet
is the style,
Maybe you have heard, 
Bertha’s clothes
and Bertha’s smile
Make her
quite a bird. “

.

!!! HOY !!!

.

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If there’s no suds,
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Soap Bubbles.

Mark Twain
said that :

” Soap and
education
are not as
sudden as a
massacre,
but they are
more deadly
in the
long run. “

Soap is one
of those
things that
pervades
every aspect
of our
daily lives in
some way,
and certainly
as part
of our daily
parlance.

That doesn’t
mean that
we’re all
that squeaky
clean,
of course —

– as the writer
G.K. Chesterton
noted:

” Man does not
live 
by soap
alone; and

hygiene, or
even health,

is not much
good unless

you can take
a healthy

view of it or,
better still,

feel a healthy
indifference

to it. “

Soap’s a
pretty simple
thing, really —
a little fat,
a little salt.

You kinda
take it for
granted, unless,
of course, someone
you know really
does take it for
granted….

— cause you’ll
quickly notice
the absence
of it’s use.

Still, soap
can make
for an
interesting
subject for
a blog post,
as we’re
attempting
to prove
today here
on the
Muscleheaded
Blog….

… by
blowing
some
nice
vintage
soap bubbles
of our own.

Let us
know
how we did.

!!! HOY !!!

.

Maurice Milliere

.