On The Stump

driveinstumpThe folks who
were buying automobiles
in the early part of
the 20th century had
several expectations
about how they were planning on using them……

And travel –
going out of town,
out of state, maybe
even out of country
and seeing the world
in their automobile
was certainly one of them.

It was a rough and ready
kinda travel, no doubt
about it – and although
the first routes could
consist of nothing but
dirt and gravel roads,
sometimes no visitormore
than horse trails and
cart tracks- –

rustic type service
businesses were quick
to spring up to bring
fuel, food, and supplies
to these hearty travelers.

Often, these places
were not only
rustic, but unusual –
a place like ” Rex’s
Redwood Log “,
otherwise known as camper
the World Famous
Drive-In Stump
Souvenir Stand
and Hamburger Joint,
in Eureka, California.

It was cut out of a
single redwood log
about 22 feet in diameter.
The place offered cheap
hand-made novelties,pal
badly cooked sandwiches,
and a free bumper sticker
with every purchase.

It was expanded into a
full service restaurant
in the 1940’s…

There was a highway
called the
“Redwood Highway”
(Old U.S. Route 199
in Northern California
and Oregon, and
parts of U.S. Rte 101
in California)
that ran past dozens
of these kinds of cichey tunnel
places centered on the
giant redwoods–

— but if your
particular fetish
was for buildings
cut out of a
single huge redwood
log like Rex’s–

well, there were also:treehouse
gas stations,
churches,
homes,
tree houses
(a natural, I guess)
garages,
lodges,
tunnels,
art galleries,hou
rest rooms,
airplanes,
railroad cars,
inns ,
huge statues of bears,
motorhomes,
playhouses,
and plenty
of tourist traps
made outgarage
of the same
material.

Not to mention,
eventually, anyway,
the world’s largest
tree stumps
and
piles of mulch.

!!! HOY !!!

bathroom

.

redwood

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Our Friday Mailbag

All of this past
week, we’ve been
celebrating our
self-declared
” Travel Week ”

( mainly because
we don’t do sharks
around here )
on the Muscleheaded Blog –

– and since it is
Friday, there’s
no reason why
we shouldn’t end it
with a bang –

( the ‘bang’ having
nothing at all to
do with person or
persons I used to
know at the old
Dolphin Motel
in Daytona Beach )

– so our mailbag
features vintage
travel postcards
of almost every
description –

( as long
as it’s sexy,
dirty, funny,
or at least
interesting ) –

– hey,
that’s fair,
ain’t it ??

The thing about
travel postcards is
that there’s about a
gazillion —
see, post cards
made for a
very inexpensive
momento that
everybody could
afford.

Before the 1940’s,
many folks never went
any further than 100
miles from home…..

Those that did
would invariably
pick up a couple
picture postcards
whenever they were
someplace interesting
to show their friends
and relatives what the
place was like.

Postcard quality varied,
of course, but generally,
the images were better
than a person could take
with their Brownie,
anyway.

Who knows, maybe
some folks would
buy/send cards
from their travels
as a way of bragging
about where they’d
been, but I think
mainly it was about
keeping in touch,
as souvenirs, and for
sharing their experiences
with the people in their
personal circle.

And obviously,
although much
less intentionally,
with us here,
in the right now.

It’s kinda
time-travelish
almost,
doncha think?

.

!!! HOY !!!

.

 

Seeing The Sights

z1Ahhhh…….

The many
splendorous
wonders of
vintage travel
postcards.

Train travel,
something that most
folks today wouldn’t
be able to tolerate
simply because it
seemed too damn
slow, was really
the way to
get around
in the 1920’s
through the 1940’s.

Oh sure,
there were airplanes —

And if you enjoyed
travelling in what
looked like a wooden
travel trailer with wings – 

— with a lack of heat,
comfort, food,
pressurization
and overall safety,
you might even
consider taking one –

Although whether you
got there faster and in
one piece was kinda a
crap shoot …..

You could take a car –

And with that option
you got bad roads, 
lousy motels,
dirty rest-rooms,
speeding tickets,
wrong directions,
non existent
road amenities,
unreadable signage,
and
frequent break downs.

But,
gas was cheap,
anyway.

When you could find it.

No, the train was
the way to go.

You could get a sleeping
berth and have your meals
in the dining car…..

Baked French Toast
on the
Sante Fe Railroad’s
” Super Chief ” line.

Yum.

Or:

— view the slow moving
scenery in an observation
car,

— have a smoke (if that
was your thing, and
back then it was just about
everybody’s) in the smoking
car,

— play cards or socialize
in the club car,

— even consume adult
beverages in the comfort
of the lounge car. 

New York to Los Angeles
in a little over 3 days.

Now,
that’s civilized travel.

The rocking of the cars
and the noise were part
of the charm — you got so
used to it, you’d think
you weren’t even moving
most of the time.

Yep–

I like trains,
and I miss that mode
of getting around.

I miss the cavernous
stations and the excitement
endemic in those places…

.. folks going here and there
in no particular hurry, often
for the first time.

People would wear their best
clothes to get on a train —

I’ve seen people wearing
what looked very much
like pajamas on an airplane.

Shit… 

Somebody just turned the
dial back to ‘the present’.

Damn it.

!!! HOY !!!